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Why Use Career Assessments?

Why Use Career Assessments?

It would be wonderful if career development professionals could just gaze into a crystal ball and discern the best path for each person. While most professionals bring with them a wealth of personal and professional knowledge and education, career planning is a complex thing to navigate even under the best of circumstances. Numerous career assessments abound on the Internet. If you’re a young adult, you may not realize that career development is still a fairly new field in the realm of human development. One pillar in the field, John Holland, first introduced his theory, known as the Holland Codes, in 1959. Through timely revisions, the Holland Codes are still helpful today as a piece of validating information. While career counseling was initially used in the military for vocational counseling, it was quickly embraced in education and then marketed to the general public when the rise of self-help books became widely acceptable. One of the best-known of these books, What Color Is Your Parachute?, was introduced in the 1970s by Richard Bolles and has since became a staple in the career development field. Sold as a self-help tool for career seekers, it is still being updated and published today. In the early 2000s, Do What You Are arrived on the scene. Representing a new kind of self-help book, it used personality type theory to help readers identify strengths and talents unique to the 16 types described by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Since its release, the book has become a time-honored tool in assisting those seeking career planning clarification. Shortly to follow was the Do What You Are® online career assessment... read more
Becoming Your Own Best Advocate

Becoming Your Own Best Advocate

The word “advocate” in Latin means “to call to one’s aid”. Generally we don’t think of needing to provide aid to ourselves, but that’s exactly what you do when advocating for yourself while working to reach your desired life goals.  As a career counselor, my focus is always on empowering clients to recognize, understand and embrace their unique innate gifts and talents. After all, how can you advocate for yourself when you don’t clearly know and embrace what you have to offer? The ability to advocate effectively for oneself in high value situations (those that mean the most to you and which typically occur within a competitive environment, such as when applying for a job, scholarship or educational program) is powerful and gratifying. It builds self-esteem and confidence, an essential foundation for success. The first step in the process is to embrace a proactive attitude. Secondly, success in any potentially competitive situation involves preparation and confidence. Analysis of your “selling points” and how to present yourself and provide solid relatable evidence of your talents and strengths is essential. The best way to do that is by using convincing behavioral examples. Any life situation, when polished and presented for the appropriate topic, can become a convincing confirmation of your candidacy. Taking the initiative in analyzing your unique examples, and understanding the impact of your personal and professional growth in the results, whether good or bad, can be difficult on your own. Professional assistance can expedite and impact the finished product. It serves one well to become comfortable and competent at self-promotion when it is needed. Promoting oneself on the ability to succeed involves demonstrating that ability... read more
Why Find a Mentor?

Why Find a Mentor?

I was in college before I ever heard the term “career counseling” — not unusual as a first-generation college student. I remember the announcement during orientation that free career counseling was available. I thought, why not check it out, especially since I was curious to see what it entailed and there was no cost involved. I already knew I wanted to be an elementary education teacher; I thought it would be interesting to see what the experts would say. As I suspected, the career assessment I took confirmed teaching. Although the assessment itself was enlightening, the most dramatic impact wasn’t the assessment result but the career counselor delivering it! As a new college student, I found him to be supportive, helpful and encouraging. It was a new experience for me and quite gratifying. Little did I know it on that first day, but we would establish a rapport that has grown into a lifelong friendship. That counselor became my mentor before I even knew what a mentoring relationship was! Our relationship grew as I would see him on campus and he would ask how things were going. Because I also worked at the campus after transferring to a university, I could keep him up to date on where things were. Bottom line: during career or educational transitions, whenever I was at a crossroads, our paths would converge and we would meet, informally or intentionally, to discuss the options and talk out a plan of action. Over the years we shared life events and built a professional relationship that was mutually beneficial and positive. The input and support were not only helpful but empowering,... read more